A Tyneside Nanoadventure

This microadventure could more aptly be described as a nanoadventure really. It involved my first, modest attempt at creating a short route, rather than following somebody elses route from a book or website. My short tick-list stipulated that it must be local, accessible by public transport and interesting, preferably involving some places I hadn’t been before.

For me a great walk should always involve a good beginning and a good finish, rather than just going from Place A to Place B. I opted for going from St Mary’s Lighthouse in Whitley Bay to North Shields Fish Quay, both notable landmarks on the north east coast which I had never been to before. The distance of my short but varied walk was roughly 5 miles, with plenty to see and do plus some decent cafes and bars – both worthwhile features to incorporate into my walk I decided.

St Mary's Lighthouse

St Mary’s Lighthouse

Traces of history and heritage are everywhere along this stretch of the coast. Tynemouth Castle is located on a rocky promontory overlooking Tynemouth Pier. Apparently the moated towers, gatehouse and keep are combined with the ruins of the Benedictine priory where early kings of Northumbria were buried.

Tynemouth Castle and priory

Tynemouth Castle and priory

Whitley Bay and Tynemouth were formerly popular resorts in the age before international travel became available to ordinary people. Now the fascinating relics of that time have been left to dissolve slowly back into the landscape. There are old paddling pools and swimming pools gradually filling with sand and mud, rotting beach huts and corroded iron railing lining the empty esplanades. Whitley Bay would almost qualify as an English ghost town.

Remains of an open air swimming pool at Tynemouth

Remains of an open air swimming pool at Tynemouth

I tried to keep away from the roadside development and to stay on the beach and the esplanades, which give a much greater insight into the history of the area. Although the esplanades themselves have faded, I noticed that rock pooling has replaced donkey rides and candy floss sellers along the coastline since I was a child.

Rockpooling on the coast near Whitley Bay

Rockpooling on the coast near Whitley Bay

I carried on past Tynemouth Castle for the first time, and around the corner into the mouth of the River Tyne. This is the main artery of the city in which I was born, but I had actually never visited the mouth of the river.

The mouth of the River Tyne from the north bank near North Shields

The mouth of the River Tyne from the north bank near North Shields

Here the atmosphere imperceptibly changes from faded seaside resort, via a short wooded section, into the modern day hustle and bustle of a busy river, with ferries plying to and fro, a lifeboat station poised for action, fish processing plants, smokehouses and dock buildings gradually increasing in density towards North Shields Fish Quay a mile or so inland.

Heading inland along the banks of the Tyne towards North Shields

Heading inland along the banks of the Tyne towards North Shields

On this short walk through an area which I have taken completely for granted because it is local, I learned a lot about the economic and social past of the area in which I grew up. I also mixed happily with the distant ghosts of childhood trips to the seaside which littered parts of this route for me.

With acknowledgements to Alastair Humphreys; creator of the micro adventure.

About rucksackrose

I enjoy wild places, hiking, camping, writing and good chat.
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4 Responses to A Tyneside Nanoadventure

  1. One of my favourite walks, we quite often do it when the sun is shining! We recently discovered the South Shields to Seaburn coastal path which we loved (http://www.newgirlintoon.co.uk/2015/07/south-shields-to-sunderland-coastal-path.html) we ended up walking around 10 miles and absolutely loved it!

    Chloe x
    newgirlintoon.co.uk

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  2. David Carroll says:

    Looks an interesting walk, Rose, and could perhaps be promoted as a local walking for health walk. 🙂

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