Using Mountain Rescue

In May I walked the Speyside Way as a way to remember someone who sadly passed away this year. During the walk I made a call to rescue services for navigational advice as there was a route discrepancy between my map and the signage. It was getting late and I was stuck in a seemingly endless rocky barbed wire corridor which wasn’t wide enough to pitch my tent. My tired reasoning was simply that a call for advice now might prevent a call for help later. Some people, who are not at all representative of my readership, were critical of this decision, so this is just a quick response to them.

In the 20 years since I began hiking, I have once requested a call out from Mountain Rescue and have sought advice two or possibly three times on solo long distance walks. On each of these occasions I made a donation to the relevant team.

Speyside Way

Speyside Way Map courtesy of LDWA and Ordnance Survey ©

I would just like to quote a DM I received from a professional rescue person (who shall remain anonymous) regarding my call for advice:

“I think if your call prevented you from getting into danger then it was worthwhile. The Mountain Rescue teams would rather you didn’t get hurt and so would I…I’ve met lots of people who should have done what you did”

I would also like to point out that, as I have a relative who was involved in mountain rescue, I realise how valuable their service is to the outdoor community. My relative sustained a permanent injury whilst carrying out a mountain rescue with his team, so I am fully aware of the risks teams face while providing this service. I am also aware of my personal responsibilities to use their resources sparingly, to donate as and when I can, and to provide the best outdoor advice I can on this site.

Pennine Way

Pennine Way route map courtesy of LDWA and Ordnance Survey ©

Thanks. Rose🌹

About rucksackrose

I enjoy wild places, hiking, camping, writing and good chat.
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