25 Gifts for under £25 🎁

If you are looking for inspiration for gifts for the outdoor person in your life, these are 25 gift suggestions under £25, for walkers of all abilities – from first timers to experienced hikers. They are all items which are in regular use in my kit.

25 Gifts
25 Gifts for walkers under £25
  • Buff – A versatile item available in a wide range of colours and designs to suit the person you are buying for
  • Head Torch – Very useful to have in your rucksack during winter walks when the days are short so you don’t get caught out
  • Gloves – Available in a huge range of colours, styles and fabrics
  • Mini Tripod – Popular items available for smartphones for those outdoor selfies
  • Drink Bottle – Possibly the most important item of kit. Available in plastic and metal
  • Flask – For that timely brew on the hills
  • Maps – One or two local maps could encourage a novice walker out on a walk
  • Waterproof Phone Case – Another increasingly popular item to protect your phone from getting wet
  • Lapel Microphone Clip – The perfect present for anyone wanting to vlog about their walks using their phone. Stops you being drowned out by wind
  • Beanie – Economical, versatile and easy to shove in your pack or your pocket when not in use
  • Compass – Another ideal gift for a newbie walker. Worth getting a decent one on a lanyard to attach it to a pack or jacket
  • Pen-knife – A good quality pen knife is a permanent part of many kit lists. Obviously it must conform to knife laws wherever you are.
  • Hand Warmers – Nice to keep hands warm in cold weather and available in a wide range of prices
  • Cheap Poles – My first set of trekking poles were pretty cheap and lasted for ages
  • Dry Bags – Always useful and available singly or in sets
  • Socks – A good outdoor shop should stock a good range of these for different times of year. Available in different sizes, colours and designs to suit the person you are buying for.
  • Outdoor Wallet – A useful gift available in synthetic or cuben to replace a bulky purse or wallet on outdoor trips
  • Head Net – An essential item in some parts of the country at certain times of year. Light and compact enough to stay in your rucksack during the summer months.
  • Gaiters – Excellent for wet and boggy terrain
  • Walking Guide Book – A good book of routes is a great present. The best ones have good maps, are pocket sized and resilient.
  • Guided Walk – In this age of things, experiential gifts are a growth market. A good experience could be to take someone on a guided trip or walk.
  • Lunch Box – Along with the drinks bottle and flask already mentioned, a good, robust lunch box is always nice to have and can last for years.
  • Attachable Accessories – You can get great drink bottles holders and cases in cuben and gridstop fabric which attach to rucksack shoulder straps and hip belts for extra space.
  • Anemometer – There are a range of hand held anemometers available for measuring temperatures and wind speeds during a walk
  • Gift Card – Available for high street stuff, digital maps and routes on most route apps

Rose🌹🎁

1FF847DF-3935-4236-BAB5-6F85AC84C3CB

Tent Talk

As regular visitors will know, I am not in the habit of posting tent pictures for the sake of it, but I couldn’t resist a couple here. For people who like this sort of thing I have started a Camping Gallery as a memento of my trips.

As the sun is shining and I am stuck at home, I have been practising pitching my preloved Mountain Laurel Designs Duomid, in a non stealth shade of yellow sinylon, and sealing my old Force Ten tent. For the Duomid, after advice from several people, I used Colin’s method of attaching my two z poles together with cord, and Emma’s suggestion of using velcro to hold them together to form a support pole. The result works really well, and encourages me to use my poles more often.

Duomid 3
Mountain Laurel Designs Sinylon Duomid and 3F UL inner first pitch
Duomid II
Getting to grips with pitching and ground sheet

I have worked out how to attach the inner to the tent using the back three pegs and the result feels really palatial after my snug Force Ten (below). It takes up a lot of space once all the guy ropes are staked out, but I guess they add to the stability of the shelter. On advice from Daron, I made a Polycro (Double glazing film) ground sheet to go under the inner and into the porch. (See above).

I welcome any advice from other Duomid users, as I hope to continue using it over the coming months. For anyone who is interested, there is a good pitching video for the Duomid on Stick’s Blog YouTube channel.

Force Ten
Force Ten Helium Carbon 100 seam sealed
Duomid Pole
Creating a support for the Duomid from two Z poles.

With thanks to Colin, Emma, Daron, Stick and Matt.

Books, Maps and Digital

I have quirky preferences about books. The world of routes in particular, has become more complex than it used to be. Personally I like to have real, paper route and route reference books rather than ebooks. I also enjoy paperback long distance walk guides, which I tend to read beforehand to save weight. However, I usually read my fiction, adventure and technical books on my e book reader.

Books
Outdoor book and map shelfie

Regarding navigation, books and maps, I prefer to keep my options open and switch from one method to another as and when the need arises, having lost maps and had phone battery run out. I explore maps, route books and apps to get ideas for my walks as well as downloading and recording routes on Viewranger. I have also been known to take photos of relevant pages in route books, so I can read them on my phone as I walk. At times I have relied entirely on digital GPX routes, but personally I am finding that maps and books remain important resources for me. I now try to ensure that I have a map and a digital route back up on all walks, but I am happy with either on it’s own.

It is a strange hybrid world that outdoor users live in now, with proponents of different methods hotly debating which is best. Recent discussion has turned to the unreliability of some downloads by or for inexperienced users.

Berwickshire Coastal Path
Berwickshire Coastal Path route

In acknowledgement of the good use I have put my day route books to, even in this digital age, I thought it would be a timely moment to mention a few of the old school route and route reference books I use as well as the downloads:

Reference Books

  • Townsend, Chris. ‘World Mountain Ranges – Scotland’ Cicerone. 2010
  • ‘The UK Trailwalker’s Handbook’ Eighth Edition. LDWA. 2009

Route Books

Northumberland:

  • Bagshaw, Chris et al. ’50 Walks in Durham and Northumbria’ AA. 2010
  • Baker, Edward. ‘Walking the Cheviots’ Sigma. 1996. Out of print.
  • Baker, Edward. ‘Walks in the Secret Kingdom’ Sigma. 1998. Out of Print
  • Brooks & Conduit. ‘Northumberland, The Borders and Hadrian’s Wall’ Pathfinder. 2000
  • Hall, Alan. ‘Walking in Northumberland’ Cicerone. 2010
  • Hallewell, Richard. ‘Short Walks in Northumbria’ The Ramblers. Collins. 2011

Scotland:

  • Hall, Alan. ‘The Border Country – A Walker’s Guide’ Cicerone. 2010
  • Jackson, Peter. ’25 Walks. The Scottish Borders’ Mercat Press. 2009
  • Turnbull, Ronald. ‘Ben Nevis and Glencoe’ Cicerone. 2007
  • Scotways. ‘Scottish Hill Tracks’ Scottish Mountaineering Trust. 2011.

Cumbria:

  • Goodier, Steve. ‘The Low Fells. Top 10 Walks’. Northern Eye. 2012
  • Marshall, Stuart. ‘Walking the Wainwrights’. Sigma. 2013

Downloads

My go-to sites for digital downloads are:

  • LDWA website (Long Distance Walkers Association) for long distance walks in Britain (downloads only available to members)
  • Walkhighlands.co.uk for long distance walks and day walks throughout Scotland
  • Viewranger navigation site and app on which I upload and download routes.

Rose 🌹 April 2017.

If you would like to recommend any new or interesting route books, sites, apps or maps, please let me know.

Chesters5
Good paths heading north to Ingram