Wooler Weekend

This midweek weekend was a much needed respite after a year in which I have been pretty cooped up in Newcastle suffering from cabin fever.

1/ Langleeford and Cheviot circular. 8.5 miles.

The first walk I had planned was an 8.5 mile circular from Langleeford 5 miles up the lovely Harthope Valley. This is the first time I have tackled the Cheviot from this valley. I treated myself to a taxi from Wooler along the road to the start of the walk in order to reach the summit before the hottest part of the day.

Harthope Valley near Langleeford

Harthope Valley near Langleeford

Everything was in full midsummer mode, the trees were verdant, the bracken was high, the elderflowers and the foxgloves were everywhere as I set off along Harthope Burn beyond the car park.

Harthope Burn

Harthope Burn

Unlike the college valley there is little pasture land in the Harthope Valley and the burn lies in a gully. I had intended to go up to the head of the valley and ascend The Cheviot from there but I lost the path upstream on the the Harthope Burn. I turned back and instead turned up Scald Hill at Langleeford Hope before turning west towards The Cheviot. This is the Northumberland County Top at 815 metres / 2675 feet although it isn’t the most exciting hill in that area. As you climb there are good views on a clear day across the valley to the distinctive outline of Hedgehope Hill.

Hedgehope Hill

Hedgehope Hill

The top of Cheviot is a flat plateau composed largely of bog and large peat hags which you cross by means of the stone flagstones which have been used on many parts of the Pennine Way. Apparently these huge flagstones come from old mill floors and they have made places like this much more accessible to walkers.

Trigpoint on Cheviot summit

Trigpoint on Cheviot summit

After a quick lunch by the trig point, I retraced my steps across the plateau to descend gradually back down the north east face towards Scald Hill. You can see on the left of the next photo just how much of the Cheviots are managed for the lucrative shooting tourists. I guess they provide a better income for the local economy than the walkers, which is a shame. Obviously it is best to avoid this area and many parts of the Cheviots during the shooting season from August to December.

Views to the east descending The Cheviot

Views to the east descending The Cheviot

As I descended down the eroded path from the tallest point in Northumberland, everything was laid out below me and I could see as far as the North Sea and Holy Island to the east. After an hour or so I arrived back at my starting point in the valley by Langleeford in time to dip my tired feet in the burn. I saw only three other walkers all day and they were all on the summit of The Cheviot.

2/ Wooler and Commonburn House circular

This wasn’t a planned hike, as I had decided to just set off on the following hot July morning with my map, compass and some lunch to see what happened.

I headed out of Wooler on the popular St Cuthbert’s Way before turning north along the lane towards Humbleton and then west around the back of Humbleton Hill. It was an intensely hot morning, but I had brought plenty of liquids and suncream, and my sun-hat was tied firmly on to protect me from the beating sun.

Lane towards Humbleton

Lane towards Humbleton

I slowly skirted the hill along rocky tracks which were dotted with banks of wild foxgloves….

Wild foxgloves on the side of Humbleton Hill

Wild foxgloves on the side of Humbleton Hill

….and past this apparently nameless lake on the boundary between the moors and cultivated farmland to the north.

Lake behind Humbleton Hill

Lake behind Humbleton Hill

When I had gone around the back of Humbleton Hill, some welcome clouds began to appear in the deep blue sky as I rejoined the St Cuthberts Way. I decided to head west along the broad grassy track for a couple of miles towards a junction by Tom Tallon’s Crag.

Looking back east along the St Cuthbert's Way towards Wooler

Looking back east along the St Cuthbert’s Way towards Wooler

The St Cuthbert's Way towards Tom Tallon Crag

The St Cuthbert’s Way towards Tom Tallon Crag

Here I turned south along a rougher track amidst the heather to the sounds of very busy bees and the occasional cry of a nesting pheasant or grouse. After a mile or so this track reaches Commonburn Farm. Here there is a razor straight, stony farm track eastwards back to Wooler, which is fairly uneventful but direct, and so began the march along it back to my starting point.

Looking across the Commonburn Valley

Looking across the Commonburn Valley

The heat started to ease off as I neared Wooler, and the scenery imperceptibly changed from the moorlands above to the gently rolling hills below.

Hills near Wooler

Hills near Wooler

This circuit was not as dramatic as yesterdays walk, but the bigger hills would have been hard work in such heat. The only place I saw any other walkers was along the St Cuthbert’s Way which seems to be increasing in popularity since I did it two years ago.

I had enjoyed two days of glorious sunshine, but as I was leaving on the bus Wooler was filling up with fell runners preparing for the popular Chevy Chase Fell Race and it was raining heavily. I realised on the way home that I have had to become adept at deciphering and taking advantage of what buses there are to and from country towns since I sold my car. Using buses has also made me feel more connected to the places I visit and the people I meet however, as well as doing my tiny bit for the environment.

I used the Harvey Maps Cheviot Hills Superwalker map for these walks.

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