Walks around Britain podcast

Earlier in the year I was approached by Andrew White of Walks around Britain along with Damian Hall (writer and ultra runner who achieved a podium position in the tough Spine Race in 2015) to discuss our very different experiences of completing the Pennine Way, a national trail which celebrates it’s 50th birthday in 2015.

I backpacked the famous national trail over 20 days during the hottest part of the year, while Damian ran the route during the coldest part of the year in only 5 days. Talking about it was a great reminder of my hike along this brilliant trail and listening to Damian about his experience was fascinating.

In the second part of the podcast we hear from organisations and people involved in repairing the erosion of the moorlands in the Peak District and the South Pennines.

Here is a link to the Walks around Britain podcast which you can subscribe to via Audioboom or iTunes.

High Cup Nick
High Cup Nick

From Slackpacker to Backpacker

Because of a fall at the end of 2012, this year got off to a slow start. My convalescent winter was spent reading about other people’s adventures, which inspired me to plan some of my own. The injury knocked my confidence, and dented confidence sometimes takes longer to recover from than broken bones.

I first ventured out into the country again on a group trip to Kirkby Stephen in February. I discovered how out of condition I was when I couldn’t complete the first 15 mile walk. I did manage a shorter walk the following day.

First trip out of 2013 to Kirkby Stephen
First trip out of 2013 to Kirkby Stephen

A few weeks later in March of 2013, I planned a week of some of my favourite Northumberland walks from a base in Rothbury in order to boost my fitness and my morale. Kirkby Stephen had taught me that I needed to take things at a more comfortable pace at first. Although it was still quite wintery on the hilltops, it was really good to get out again and revisit north Northumberland.

College Burn
College Burn near Westnewton

As some of you will know, my big plan for 2013 was to walk the Pennine Way to raise funds for Crisis UK, so I knew I had to get back into condition. With advice from some people about my camping kit, I began my attempt to transform myself from a slackpacker to a self supporting backpacker.

PW Kit
Backpacking kit for the Pennine Way

I made plans to do two hikes in the spring; the 65 mile St Cuthbert’s Way during the wintery April, followed by the 75 mile Cumbria Way during May. I never stop learning when I hike, and these hikes were no exception. I was able to experiment with new kit, footwear, and different kinds of accommodation. The strange weather of the 2013 spring presented challenges on both walks, with 25cm of snow in places across the Scottish borders, and hail showers on the Cumbria Way.

Eildons
Snow on the Eildons

When the time came for me to set off on the Pennine Way in June, I was apprehensive about my achy tendons, and about camping in my new tent. I had consulted a podiatrist who gave me some exercises designed to prevent tendon injury, and sought some advice about camping, but I was still nervous when I arrived at Edale in June.

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Pennine Way practice in the garden

With hindsight, I can honestly say that all the kit and exercise preparation I did, and all the advice I sought turned out to be valuable. I saw quite a few people on the Pennine Way during the summer heatwave with problems such as sunburn, heat exhaustion, heavy packs and injury, which luckily didn’t affect me during my hike.

Pennine Way route map
Pennine Way route map

I completed the hike in 20 days but allowed a few negative comments at the end to get under my skin, which wasn’t helpful. My advice is to avoid negative people as they will drag you down. Some of the “areas for improvement” which emerged on the Pennine Way were my wild-camping and my mountain skills so the remainder of 2013 has been spent trying to address these issues.

I was lucky enough to team up with 4 other wild-campers on Twitter for my first wild camp in the Peak District. After the Pennine Way, it was relaxing not to have a schedule to adhere to, and to have the logistics planned by somebody else. Many people have made the point that we are generally much safer in the hills than we are in most cities, so I have no excuses left to stop me getting out there to wild camp in 2014.

I had planned to try and fit two more short trails in to the end of the year, but responsibilities at home have put these on hold. I did manage half of the Northumberland coast path which I hope to finish at some stage.

Alnmouth
Alnmouth

I can’t write about this year without mentioning some of the people in it, as well as the hikes. As my ambitions to do longer trails have grown, I have realised that the best people to turn to for advice are people who have done them. It was therefore a huge pleasure to meet trail walkers Sarah, Alasdair, Colin and Chris and to chat about many aspects of their experience on some of the worlds great trails. In October I was invited to the Lake District by the National Trust to meet Tanya Oliver of Fix the Fells to see some of the vital path maintenance they do to tackle problems caused by erosion and poor drainage on the upland fell paths. This fascinating day with Tanya also kickstarted my Wainwright bagging again in the Central Fells.

Tanya Oliver
Tanya Oliver surveys her workplace

All these experiences have meant that the line between myself and mountaineers has started to become a bit blurred and meaningless. In November I therefore took myself to the Kendal Mountain Festival to meet some more mountaineers. Over the weekend I met some friendly people, enjoyed some good craic, and saw some great talks and films, so I look forward to returning in the future. Watching films about mountains in the snow finally persuaded me that I need to improve my winter skills if I am going to complete any longer trails. Thus the year ended with me playing with my first ice axe and crampons at a Winter Skills lecture and booking myself onto a course.

At the end of 2013, many of the assumptions I had about hiking have disappeared, and I find myself wanting to improve my mountain skills in the coming year. Thanks for reading and I hope all your plans for next year come to fruition. All I can say about 2013 really is who knew!

Cross Fell
Summit of Cross Fell

The End of a Vintage Year

2013 has been an vintage adventure year with three solo trails and a return to the Lakeland fells. Although my hiking has been confined to this country, I have experienced everything from deep snow in April to intense heat three months later, which has presented some challenges. I have also met and listened to some inspiring people, with fascinating tales to tell, so lots to learn and write up in my review of the year, coming soon.

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Milecastle, Hadrian’s Wall

Last chance to donate

Just a quick post to remind you that the Just Giving page for my Pennine Way for Crisis UK walk closes on 31st August. (NOW CLOSED) All donors who identify themselves will receive a digital thank you photo from the walk. The Twitter hashtag for all news and updates about the walk is #RosePW. Once again many thanks to all the people and companies who have supported the walk in cash and in kind.

Hadrian's Wall
Hadrian’s Wall

New videos of the Pennine Way

I have now found time to make some detailed videos of my Pennine Way walk for Crisis UK, as my highlights video had to be edited down so much. I hope these new videos will appeal to some of you. They include the complete walk as well as various sections of the route including the Peak District, the Yorkshire Dales, the North Pennines, Cumbria, Northumberland, the Scottish Border.

All my distance walk and trail videos can be found on this Long distance walk playlist. I hope you enjoy them as much as I enjoyed creating them.

Rose

Finishing the Pennine Way

Just a quick hello to say that I am safely back from my Pennine Way walk for Crisis UK which took 20 days and was supported by Cotswold Outdoor and Gossamer Gear. I apologise that I was unable to post to this blog during the walk but I was without phone signal, 3G or wifi for most of the route with my ineffective sim card. I have published a write-up of the walk which I hope you enjoy. You can see videos on YouTube, photos on Twitter under the hashtag #RosePW and you can donate until the end of August 2013  by texting ROSE71 £(Amount) to 70070 🙂

Thanks for supporting my Pennine Way for Crisis UK
Thanks for supporting my Pennine Way for Crisis UK

Pennine Way walk for Crisis UK

The Twitter hashtag for my Pennine Way for Crisis UK updates and photos is #RosePW

*Latest news*

Setting off on the Pennine Way is now imminent. I have completed my training walks and devised my schedule, which involves staying in a mixture of campsites, hostels & B&Bs, and includes a couple of rest days. I have been trying to rest and promote the walk for the last week or so and will be using Twitter, Instagram and Audioboo to post updates during the walk.

This is my kit list and I would like to thank Cotswold Outdoor and Gossamer Gear for supporting the walk.

Backpacking kit for the Pennine Way

Time in reconnaissance…

As I have now completed the St Cuthbert’s Way, the Cumbria Way plus a week of day walking as part of my training plan for my Pennine Way walk for Crisis, I am now resting up until I start my charity walk later this month.

I have recently been assembling and testing out my kit for the walk including a new lightweight tent, sleeping bag and sleeping mat. I am relatively new to camping while I walk, so this has included getting some advice and sleeping out for trial weekends to discover what works and what doesn’t.

Here are a couple of pictures of the tent and equipment I will be using for the walk. If you would like to donate to raise money for the homeless this is the Just Giving Page

Trying out my kit in the garden

Many thanks for reading.

Rose

Pennine Way planning

My thoughts are turning to my (completed in July 2013) Pennine Way walk for Crisis UK. Behind the scenes, I have been preparing for this walk. This has included assembling a kit which will hopefully meet the needs of the walk.

The main aim of my kit is to ensure that I can reach my destination in comfort. I have learned to focus on comfort and weight as the key factors for success on my walks so far. Some companies have been generous enough to offer discounts on some of the items I needed most. In particular Gossamer Gear in the U.S. offered me a discount on their 65L Mariposa rucksack which is one of the few of that size weighing in at less than 1kg. This is less than half the weight of my previous rucksack.

Gossamer Gear Mariposa rucksack
Gossamer Gear Mariposa rucksack

I have also been finalising my walking schedule in order to be able to book my accommodation for the journey. I am hoping to do about 18 days walking plus 2/3 rest days spread out along the way. As usual the accommodation has ended up being a mixture of hostels, bunkhouses, B&Bs and campsites. As I am not yet up to speed as a wild camper I have opted for campsites which give me the option of support, provisions, basic facilities & being a bit more sociable if I have the energy!

My training for the walk is going to plan. I have a range of warm up exercises to do which hopefully will keep me injury free. I also did 5 days of walking in north Northumberland in March 2013, the 70 mile St Cuthbert’s Way  walk in April 2013, and I am planning the Cumbria Way for May 2013.

One highlight of the St. Cuthbert’s Way was stopping for the night in Kirk Yetholm which is the official northern end of the Pennine Way. This boot garden was a sobering reminder of all the previous people to have attempted the walk and of how tough the walk will be. I hope that I make it back here in a better state than some of these boots.

Boot Garden
Boot garden at Kirk Yetholm

If any of you can afford to donate to CrisisUK to speed me on my way I would be very grateful. This is the link to my Just Giving page

Kirk Yetholm
Kirk Yetholm