Tramping around Tyneside

3 years ago I moved from the borders back to Newcastle. Because I wasn’t sure whether there would be demand for urban walks on my site, I made a YouTube playlist of my Tyne and Wear walks but didn’t create GPX files as I do for most of my trips. As I am again confined to walking close to home, I thought I would share these walks on ViewRanger, as well as YouTube.

Sometimes life limits the options we have open to us for outdoor pursuits. I hope you will enjoy these Tyne and Wear walks. They are all accessible by public transport – one advantage of city walking.

St Mary’s Lighthouse, Whitley Bay
Tyne Bridge and Millenium Bridge, Newcastle
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Exploring my own back yard

In 2015 I had to compromise all my adventure plans and explore what was on my doorstep instead. This was due to family responsibilities, dreadful public transport and lack of resources. As a lover of wild places it was hard not to view this as a demotion. Following 5 long distance trails and 15 years of walking in some of Britain’s least populated hills in Northumberland and the Scottish Borders, it is easy to become a bit of a purist.

Heading inland along the banks of the Tyne towards North Shields
Heading inland along the banks of the Tyne towards North Shields

I suppose I was trying to expunge my urban roots and a long spell living in London, but some people on Twitter have reminded me that there is plenty to see and some valuable wild space in large cities if you know where to look.

The whole national park movement was intended to bring the countryside within reach of ordinary people. However, for purists there is a temptation to want the ordinary people out of the parks again, and this doesn’t sit well with me.Β All this has involved me in some navel gazing about my attitudes.

Newcastle Quayside from the Millennium Bridge
Newcastle Quayside from the Millennium Bridge

Inspired by some groups trying to create National City Parks in London and Glasgow, and by people like Alastair Humphreys promoting the idea of finding do-able adventures on your doorstep, I have been exploring my own back yard a bit.

North Shields Fish Quay Area
Union Quay by North Shields Fish Quay

Like many people, I thought I knew my local area so well that it had nothing to teach me. However I have gradually realised that familiarity had bred some contempt, and that necessity can indeed be the mother of invention.

Bolam Coyne in the Byker Wall development by Ralph Erskine
Grade 2 Listed Bolam Coyne in the Byker Wall development by Ralph Erskine

I will continue to bring you posts from wild places, but I need to shape my interests around the possible for the moment. For those of us who live in cities for whatever reason, we either discount this kind of walking and sit at home reading other people’s wild adventures, or we get out there.

With apologies to the purists.

A Tyneside Nanoadventure

This microadventure could more aptly be described as a nanoadventure really. It involved my first, modest attempt at creating a short route, rather than following somebody elses route from a book or website. My short tick-list stipulated that it must be local, accessible by public transport and interesting, preferably involving some places I hadn’t been before. The final result is also on YouTube and ViewRanger now if you would like to give it a go.

For me a great walk should always involve a good beginning and a good finish, rather than just going from Place A to Place B. I opted for going from St Mary’s Lighthouse in Whitley Bay to North Shields Fish Quay, both notable landmarks on the north east coast which I had never been to before. The distance of my short but varied walk was roughly 5 miles, with plenty to see and do plus some decent cafes and bars – both worthwhile features to incorporate into my walk I decided.

St Mary's Lighthouse
St Mary’s Lighthouse

Traces of history and heritage are everywhere along this stretch of the coast. Tynemouth Castle is located on a rocky promontory overlooking Tynemouth Pier. Apparently the moated towers, gatehouse and keep are combined with the ruins of the Benedictine priory where early kings of Northumbria were buried.

Tynemouth Castle and priory
Tynemouth Castle and priory

Whitley Bay and Tynemouth were formerly popular resorts in the age before international travel became available to ordinary people. Now the fascinating relics of that time have been left to dissolve slowly back into the landscape. There are old paddling pools and swimming pools gradually filling with sand and mud, rotting beach huts and corroded iron railing lining the empty esplanades. Whitley Bay would almost qualify as an English ghost town.

Remains of an open air swimming pool at Tynemouth
Remains of an open air swimming pool at Tynemouth

I tried to keep away from the roadside development and to stay on the beach and the esplanades, which give a much greater insight into the history of the area. Although the esplanades themselves have faded, I noticed that rock pooling has replaced donkey rides and candy floss sellers along the coastline since I was a child.

Rockpooling on the coast near Whitley Bay
Rockpooling on the coast near Whitley Bay

I carried on past Tynemouth Castle for the first time, and around the corner into the mouth of the River Tyne. This is the main artery of the city in which I was born, but I had actually never visited the mouth of the river.

The mouth of the River Tyne from the north bank near North Shields
The mouth of the River Tyne from the north bank near North Shields

Here the atmosphere imperceptibly changes from faded seaside resort, via a short wooded section, into the modern day hustle and bustle of a busy river, with ferries plying to and fro, a lifeboat station poised for action, fish processing plants, smokehouses and dock buildings gradually increasing in density towards North Shields Fish Quay a mile or so inland.

Heading inland along the banks of the Tyne towards North Shields
Heading inland along the banks of the Tyne towards North Shields

On this short walk through an area which I have taken completely for granted because it is local, I learned a lot about the economic and social past of the area in which I grew up. I also mixed happily with the distant ghosts of childhood trips to the seaside which littered parts of this route for me.

With acknowledgements to Alastair Humphreys; creator of the micro adventure.

Making hay while the sun shines

A sudden fear that the year was passing me by without my getting out and enjoying it has brought about a bit of a flurry of short walks and trips. All the well worn sayings about when to make hay sprang to mind, so today I jumped on the metro to the coast to do a local-ish short walk from Cullercoats to Tynemouth, so here are some sunny days captured to hoard for those dark days of winter. This short walk is now on both YouTube and ViewRanger if you only have limited time.

Cullercoats, Tyneside
Cullercoats, Tyneside

This short linear 2.5 mile / 4 km walk was from Cullercoats Metro past the lifeboat station on the North East coast, and Tynemouth Castle to Front Street at Tynemouth near the mouth of the River Tyne. The beginning and end of the walk were near to Cullercoats and Tynemouth stations on the Newcastle metro system.

Looking south from Tynemouth beach
Looking south from Tynemouth beach

The route was awash with plenty of cafes and restaurants for refreshments, and the weekend market at Tynemouth station was in full flow.

Tynemouth Beach
Tynemouth Beach

A flag system indicated that swimming was permitted there on that day.

Looking north towards Tynemouth Castle
Looking north towards Tynemouth Castle.