25 Gifts for under £25 🎁

If you are looking for inspiration for gifts for the outdoor person in your life, these are 25 gift suggestions under £25, for walkers of all abilities – from first timers to experienced hikers. They are all items which are in regular use in my kit.

25 Gifts
25 Gifts for walkers under £25
  • Buff – A versatile item available in a wide range of colours and designs to suit the person you are buying for
  • Head Torch – Very useful to have in your rucksack during winter walks when the days are short so you don’t get caught out
  • Gloves – Available in a huge range of colours, styles and fabrics
  • Mini Tripod – Popular items available for smartphones for those outdoor selfies
  • Drink Bottle – Possibly the most important item of kit. Available in plastic and metal
  • Flask – For that timely brew on the hills
  • Maps – One or two local maps could encourage a novice walker out on a walk
  • Waterproof Phone Case – Another increasingly popular item to protect your phone from getting wet
  • Lapel Microphone Clip – The perfect present for anyone wanting to vlog about their walks using their phone. Stops you being drowned out by wind
  • Beanie – Economical, versatile and easy to shove in your pack or your pocket when not in use
  • Compass – Another ideal gift for a newbie walker. Worth getting a decent one on a lanyard to attach it to a pack or jacket
  • Pen-knife – A good quality pen knife is a permanent part of many kit lists. Obviously it must conform to knife laws wherever you are.
  • Hand Warmers – Nice to keep hands warm in cold weather and available in a wide range of prices
  • Cheap Poles – My first set of trekking poles were pretty cheap and lasted for ages
  • Dry Bags – Always useful and available singly or in sets
  • Socks – A good outdoor shop should stock a good range of these for different times of year. Available in different sizes, colours and designs to suit the person you are buying for.
  • Outdoor Wallet – A useful gift available in synthetic or cuben to replace a bulky purse or wallet on outdoor trips
  • Head Net – An essential item in some parts of the country at certain times of year. Light and compact enough to stay in your rucksack during the summer months.
  • Gaiters – Excellent for wet and boggy terrain
  • Walking Guide Book – A good book of routes is a great present. The best ones have good maps, are pocket sized and resilient.
  • Guided Walk – In this age of things, experiential gifts are a growth market. A good experience could be to take someone on a guided trip or walk.
  • Lunch Box – Along with the drinks bottle and flask already mentioned, a good, robust lunch box is always nice to have and can last for years.
  • Attachable Accessories – You can get great drink bottles holders and cases in cuben and gridstop fabric which attach to rucksack shoulder straps and hip belts for extra space.
  • Anemometer – There are a range of hand held anemometers available for measuring temperatures and wind speeds during a walk
  • Gift Card – Available for high street stuff, digital maps and routes on most route apps

Rose🌹🎁

Wild Watching 🎬

The dark evenings are great for watching films, whether it’s from the comfort of your sofa or tucked up inside your tent on a hill. These are ten great new and classic outdoor films for some wild watching.

Wild Watching: 10 Recommended Outdoor Films
(In alphabetical order).

  • 127 Hours. Directed by Danny Boyle (2010).
  • Everest. Directed by Baltasar Kormákur (2015).
  • Force Majeure. Directed by Ruben Östlund (2014).
  • Into the Wild. Directed by Sean Penn (2007).
  • Koyaanisqatsi. Directed by Godfrey Reggio. Music by Philip Glass (1982).
  • The River Wild. Directed by Curtis Hanson (1994).
  • The Way. Directed by Emilio Estevez (2010).
  • Touching the Void. Directed by Kevin MacDonald (2003).
  • Walking Out. Directed by Andrew and Alex Smith (2018).
  • Wild. Directed by Jean Marc Vallee (2014).

You can find reviews of all these films arranged geographically in my Reviews section.

Happy Viewing
Happy Viewing

Rose🌹🎬

Top Twelve Tomes 📚

As the gift season is upon us again, I thought it would be a timely moment to mention a few top new and classic outdoor and adventure books for the reader in your life, or indeed for you.

Bookshelf
Outdoor Book Shelfie

Outdoor & Adventure Books
(In alphabetical order)

  • Walking Home: Travels with a troubadour on the Pennine Way by Simon Armitage
  • Blind Descent: Surviving alone and blind on Mount Everest by Brian Dickinson.
  • The Last Englishman: A 2,650 mile hiking adventure on the Pacific Crest Trail by Keith Foskett
  • Balancing on Blue by Keith Foskett
  • Into Thin Air: A personal account of the Everest disaster by Jon Krakauer
  • Mountains of the Mind by Robert MacFarlane
  • The Lost Words by Robert MacFarlane
  • Ramble On: The story of our love for walking in Great Britain by Sinclair McKay
  • Touching the Void by Joe Simpson
  • Wild: A Journey from Lost to Found by Cheryl Strayed
  • Rattlesnakes and Bald Eagles: Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail by Chris Townsend
  • Out There by Chris Townsend

Some of these books are reviewed in my Reviews section.

Happy Reading
Happy Reading

Rose 🌹📚

Rucksack Rose at 5

On 17th September this year it was 5 years since I began to create Rucksack Rose on this blog and YouTube. For those who don’t know, Rucksack Rose was originally dedicated to my mum, and was intended to share the good and simple things in the outdoor world such as beauty and kindness.

RR5
Rucksack Rose 5th Birthday

I had great plans for this fifth year but, without going into details, bullying by a small group of trolls laid waste to some of them, which was a very sad moment for me and for this blog. Anyway, having taken advice, I am pressing on. Can I simply ask that if you don’t respect me, my content or my aims, you just unfollow. It’s really not that difficult.

Anyway, I always try to end on an up – I know you’ve all heard this stuff before, but to those who have stuck by me for all or some of the last five years for the right reasons, I would like to say a big thank you for over 101k YouTube views, 103k blog views, as well as your advice and inspiration. I genuinely appreciate all these things and I will continue to try and keep to the original intentions of the blog which are outlined in the About section.

RR Thanks
Rucksack Rose Thank You

Happy Hiking. Rose🌹

Using Mountain Rescue

In May I walked the Speyside Way as a way to remember someone who sadly passed away this year. During the walk I made a call to rescue services for navigational advice as there was a route discrepancy between my map and the signage. It was getting late and I was stuck in a seemingly endless rocky barbed wire corridor which wasn’t indicated on my map, and wasn’t wide enough to pitch my tent in. My tired reasoning was simply that a call for advice now might prevent a call for help later. Unfortunately the people I spoke to were unable to answer my query on that occasion. When I mentioned this dilemma on Twitter after my return, a few people, who are not representative of my readership, were critical of my decision to make a call, so this is just a quick response to them.

In the 20 years since I began hiking, I have once requested a call out from Mountain Rescue following an attack of vertigo, and have sought advice (usually regarding route diversions) two or possibly three times on solo long distance walks. On each of these occasions I made a donation to the relevant team.

Speyside Way
Speyside Way Map courtesy of LDWA and Ordnance Survey ©

I would just like to quote a DM I received from a professional rescue person (who shall remain anonymous) regarding my call for advice:

“I think if your call prevented you from getting into danger then it was worthwhile. The Mountain Rescue teams would rather you didn’t get hurt and so would I…I’ve met lots of people who should have done what you did”

I would also like to point out that, as I have a relative who was involved in mountain rescue, I realise how valuable their service is to the outdoor community. My relative sustained a permanent injury whilst carrying out a rescue with his team, so I am fully aware of the risks teams face while providing this service. I am also aware of my personal responsibilities to use their resources sparingly, to donate as and when I can, and to provide the best outdoor advice I can on this site.

Pennine Way
Pennine Way route map courtesy of LDWA and Ordnance Survey ©

Thanks. Rose🌹

The Farne Islands revisited

This is the time of year that I start to get restless for a trip offshore to see the seabirds and the grey seals. A quick glance at the weather and the bus timetable, with the bonus of online booking, and I was off on the long bus journey up the coast to revisit the Fabulous Farnes.

The Farne Islands are a group of islands off the coast of Northumberland. There are between 15 and 20 islands depending on the tide. They are scattered between 1½ – 5 miles (2.5–7.5 km) from the mainland and divided into the Inner and the Outer islands.

At this time of year there is thankfully much to see from the bus with the sun shining, the trees greening up, the daffodils at their best, and the colours gradually returning to the sea and the skies.

IMG_4498
St Cuthbert II, Seahouses Harbour. Billy Shiels Boat Trips.

My ticket included a cruise of the islands from Seahouses with a landing on Inner Farne bird reserve for an hour. As well as raising my spirits after northern winters, I used the  opportunity of another trip to re-record a video of the trip which incorporates the best short walk in north eastern England.

Among the birds and animals I saw on this trip were Puffins, Grey Seals, Kittiwakes, Guillemots and Shags but it varies at different times of year. The onboard commentary and the NT Ranger’s talk provide plenty of specialised information on what birds are there and the history of the islands.

Inner Farne Circular
Inner Farne Circular walk route. Map by National Trust ©

With thanks to the crew of the St Cuthbert II from Billy Shiels Boat Trips (Other cruises are available) and the National Trust Rangers on Inner Farne for a great day out and a reminder that there is more to the Farne Islands than the puffins.

Caves, carvings and crags

As well as the geographical posts which focus on a particular area or valley, I have been gradually creating themed walk collections from my Northumberland routes which I can add to as and when. Sometimes it is interesting to focus on one aspect or feature of an area, which can then be done as a group. So far there are walk collections in the Northumberland section featuring the coast, castles, waterfalls and short walks.

I’ve always had a soft spot for a sacred site or a cave, so my latest collection Rock Routes features some of my personal favourite geological, historical and archaeological places in Northumberland with links to GPS files.

Screen Shot 2017-03-09 at 11.10.27
Clockwise: Roughting Linn Rock Art, St Cuthbert’s Cave, McCartney’s Cave, Simonside Hills

As well as videos, I am gradually enriching my blog by adding more maps, data sheets and GPS links to all my posts. I hope you will enjoy these moderate walks which are all lovely in different ways.

Short and sweet

I have listed a selection of six of my favourite short, easy walks (under 5 miles long) in Northumberland, hand picked because they contain some lovely places. Take your pick from castles, waterfalls, grey seals, St Cuthbert’s Chapel, puffins, scheduled ancient monuments, salmon fishermen and pristine beaches on walks which are suitable for all the family. They all have easy parking and facilities such as pubs, cafes and shops nearby, details of which are included on the page. Take a look at Six Shorts in the Northumberland section.

6 short walks in Northumberland
6 short walks in Northumberland